Dating 101 how to balance the power in your relationship

Whether it is a friend, a sibling, or other acquaintance, it can be helpful to include a larger community in your relationship for the purposes of safety and balance.

In some collectivistic cultures, families can be at the forefront of relationships—so much so that they interfere with the natural progression.

Or they provide so many opinions that it starts to get confusing who to listen to while you are sorting out your own feelings.As such, it might be helpful to limit your advisors to a couple close friends or family members. But getting another pair of eyes on your relationship and its health can help.Many times in the heat of an argument one partner might throw out the “let’s end it now” card. At their most basic level, they involve setting your ego aside.While it’s ultimately a power move, see your partner’s reaction. Apologies aren’t actually about who is right and who is wrong.Is he so egotistically-driven that he won’t take a second look back? It’s about acknowledging your partner’s feelings and validating them. That was not my intention.” It can end right there. In the dance of dating, the process of getting to know someone occurs over time.

Will he say ending the relationship is “your choice? While fake remorse and sorrow isn’t the name of the game, neither is a staunch refusal to accept you might have stepped on one’s toes. However, in this day and age of technological connectivity it can be easy to get to know a person at turbo speed.

While this article is written within a heterosexist frame, many of these same concerns can apply to same sex relationships as well. While it’s wonderful that women can approach and ask out a man without waiting for him to do it, there is also a delicate balance in the relationship. The investment factor seamlessly leads to an even more important type of initiative.

You ask him any iteration of relationship check-up questions and he’s either unsure, needs more time, or tables the topic entirely.

Then when it didn’t work out they’d feel badly…about themselves.

No, not the guy who said all of these offensive things or treated a woman disrespectfully.

While often red flags come in the more obvious forms (he is verbally abusive, physically aggressive) it’s the more subtle ones we miss.