Dating a bi girl

But on the other side of the coin, it makes me sad that I even need to hide or worry about these things." "I have avoided telling my queer friends that I am in a relationship with a man.

It's like coming out all over again and I've experienced resistance against it.

You know that you've hit on the truth.) And, for most of our relationship, all it's really meant is making some past relationships with women make a whole lot more sense.

When we moved into our new house, which is in a pretty normal sleepy community, it was almost Fourth of July and everyone had American Flags so we got a rainbow American Flag and put it out.

I kind of held my breath waiting for neighbors to react, but they were like, 'Yay! ' Even the 75-year-old lady with the NRA stickers on her car was a huge fan." "One of my most jarring experiences as a bi woman was when, in a play group, one of the other mothers asked really earnestly, 'What would you guys do if your kid turned out to be gay?

In a way, marrying a man makes it easy to 'hide.' People just assume you're straight.

It can be freeing not to have to worry about people's negative reactions to even just seeing you with your partner.

'" "I think the weirdest thing for me isn't the judgment of other people (since I just pass for straight), but the idea of what could have been.

Just before I met my current dude (4.5 years and counting), I was trading messages with a gorgeous lady vegan baker.

Shortly before I married my husband, I finally left Christianity behind, for many reasons. I was finally able to think about who I really am and what I really believe without some old white guy telling me the 'right' answers and condemning me for any deviance. Part of this was learning that I'm not straight.

I realized that I was falling in love with one of my female friends (who is also bisexual).

I also started to realize that strict monogamy may not be the best idea for me.

I would very much like to be able to love more than one person, but my husband is and wants us to remain strictly monogamous. I think my parents would accept my bisexuality, especially since I'm married to a man and therefore not actually dating women, but they're still busy processing the fact that I'm not Christian.

I love activism and I love running my mouth but even now, being out, I don't feel like there's a place for me at queer events." "A month or two ago at a house party, I told a few people I was bisexual. He's 15 and his older brother is 18 (and hasn't been told) and I'd been wondering for a long time about how to address it with them, if I needed to address it, or if I should just let it be.