Herpes type one dating

However, I imagine a survey of the general population would swing the other way just a bit ;) Thanks again.

I share Jones' concern with this question: "If known positive, we're ok (can't transmit to genital area if already postive oral, correct? If a person is tested and already has antibodies for oral herpes / Type I, does that mean that he or she cannot receive that virus on his/her genitals? HHH, Thanks for always taking time to answer our questions.

Despite those rare complications, you seem to have an atypical level of concern about genital herpes in general and HSV-1 in particular. Well my doctor said you can get genital herpes from that, but most people don't realize that. " Me: "Well, yeah I did, but the likelihood..." The conversation breaks down at that point form a combination of the look of horror on her face and inconsolable crying. My genital herpes concern doesn't really stem from a worry about my own health.

You had said "I would not recomend anybody intentionlly acquire any HSV infection, whether type 1 or 2.Although serious complications are rare, they do occur; every year a number of people die of HSV infections or their complications, or are permanently disabled." I'm guessing you are talking about swelling of the brain for death and children who acquire the HSV during birth as debilitating conditions.The mechanics of hsv-1 transmition have been well covered.I'm really looking for good advice on how to deal with an oral hsv-1 infection and dating.Almost nothing is known about most of the factors that may raise or lower the risk in any particular case, such as: a) how long the orally infected person has had HSV-1, and therefore the infected person's age (it's a fair bet that teens might be more likely to transmit HSV-1 than older persons, but no data exist); b) whether the infected person has symptoms of oral herpes, how frequently, and how recently; c) whether or not the infected person has had a cold or other illness that could reactivate HSV-1; d) details of the sexual exposure; and on it goes. I would not recomend anybody intentionlly acquire any HSV infection, whether type 1 or 2.

Until such research is available, the answers to all your questions will be little more than guesswork and common sense--and "common sense" often is wrong! Actually, they are being done increasingly as a routine when people have HSV testing. Should all people with positive blood tests for HSV-1 alter their sexual behavior and/or inform their partners? Although serious complications are rare, they do occur; every year a number of people die of HSV infections or their complications, or are permanently disabled.

If you could get it on your lip or your arm, we wouldn't be having this web discussion.

Its the fact that you can get it on your lip and your genitals (yeah, I know, also on your finger or in your eye and possibly progress to your brain, but for the most part, lips and naughty bits).

So its like I'm having a difficult "STD disclosure" discussion, early on in the relationship that most people just kind of ignore and stay blissfully ignorant of. The likelihood of someone having oral herpes probalby is almost as high in someone who says they don't have it as in those who say they have had cold sores.

Here's my general plan going forward, plus some quesions mixed in: - Ask hsv-1 status - If known positive, we're ok (can't transmit to genital area if already postive oral, correct? Q6 The idea is that, its highly likely that she'll be infected eventually. Equally important, many people who say they have had oral herpes in fact have not.

Also, if I knew I was likely to catch HSV-1, I would prefer genital over oral.