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The little man treated Elmer like a large damp dog, and Elmer licked his shoes and followed.

Title: Elmer Gantry (1927) Author: Sinclair Lewis * A Project Gutenberg of Australia e Book * e Book No.: 0300851Edition: 1 Language: English Character set encoding: HTML--Latin-1(ISO-8859-1)--8 bit Date first posted: May 2003 Date most recently updated: May 2003 This e Book was produced by: Don Lainson [email protected] Gutenberg of Australia e Books are created from printed editions which are in the public domain in Australia, unless a copyright notice is included. The light was dim, completely soothing, coming through fantastic windows such as are found only in churches, saloons, jewelry shops, and other retreats from reality. How much cash would it bring in to quote all that stuff--what the dickens was it now? But still, if his mother claimed she was doing so well with her millinery business and wanted him to be a college graduate, he'd stick by it.

We do NOT keep any e Books in compliance with a particular paper edition. Be sure to check the copyright laws for your country before downloading or redistributing this file. Lefferts, with protestations of distinguished pleasure. Elmer and Jim Lefferts retired to a table to nourish the long, rich, chocolate strains suitable to drunken melody. Jim had a resolute tenor, and as to Elmer Gantry, even more than his bulk, his thick black hair, his venturesome black eyes, you remembered that arousing barytone. He never said anything important, and he always said it sonorously. --all that rot about "The world is too much around us, early and soon" from that old fool Wordsworth? Lot easier than pitching hay or carrying two-by-fours anyway. A., for with all the force of his simple and valiant nature he detested piety and admired drunkenness and profanity.

Though Elmer was the athletic idol of the college, though his occult passion, his heavy good looks, caused the college girls to breathe quickly, though his manly laughter was as fetching as his resonant speech, Elmer was never really liked.

He was supposed to be the most popular man in college; every one believed that every one else adored him; and none of them wanted to be with him.

They did a comic thing once--they got twisted and the right leg leaped in front of the left when, so far as he could make out, it should have been behind.

It was lamentable to see this broad young man, who would have been so happy in the prize-ring, the fish-market, or the stock exchange, poking through the cobwebbed corridors of Terwillinger.

" muttered one Eddie Fislinger, who, though he was a meager and rusty-haired youth with protruding teeth and an uneasy titter, had attained power in the class by always being present at everything, and by the piety and impressive intimacy of his prayers in the Y. He appointed Jim Lefferts chairman of the ticket committee, and between them, by only the very slightest doctoring of the books, they turned forty dollars to the best of all possible uses. " observed a Judas who three minutes before had been wrestling with God under Eddie's coaching. Thus it happened that he had no friend save Jim Lefferts.

At the beginning of Senior year, Elmer announced that he desired to be president again. and ready to bring his rare talents to the Baptist ministry, asserted after an enjoyable private prayer-meeting in his room that he was going to face Elmer and forbid him to run. Only Jim had enough will to bully him into obedient admiration.

To elect any one as class-president twice was taboo. Elmer swallowed ideas whole; he was a maelstrom of prejudices; but Jim accurately examined every notion that came to him.

The ardent Eddie Fislinger, now president of the Y. Jim was selfish enough, but it was with the selfishness of a man who thinks and who is coldly unafraid of any destination to which his thoughts may lead him.

" He collected the class-fund by demanding subscriptions as arbitrarily as a Catholic priest assessing his parishoners for a new church. There was a custom that the manager of the Athletic Association should not be a member of any team. He halted, and spoke of football, quantitative chemistry, and the Arkansas spinster who taught German. Desperately, his voice shrill with desire to change the world, Eddie stammered: "Say--say, Hell-cat, you hadn't ought to run for president again. " "Somebody's going to be." "Ah, gee, Elmer, don't run for it. Course all the fellows are crazy about you but--Nobody's ever been president twice. " Eddie remembered how Elmer and Jim had shown a Freshman his place in society by removing all his clothes and leaving him five miles in the country.