Photographic techniques dating from the 19th century

Cinematography is the art of positioning a camera and lighting a scene. An individual who helps guide and shape the future development of a community.

A city planner considers environmental and social issues, and what kinds of resources are needed to improve the quality of life for the community residents, particularly in terms of what types of new building projects may be necessary.

Also, a substance, such as a dye, pigment, or paint, that imparts a hue. Colors located opposite one another on the color wheel.When mixed together, complementary colors produce a shade of gray or brown.When one stares at a color for a sustained period of time then looks at a white surface, an afterimage of the complementary color will appear. The arrangement of the individual elements within a work of art so as to form a unified whole; also used to refer to a work of art, music, or literature, or its structure or organization. Art that emerged in the late 1960s, emphasizing ideas and theoretical practices rather than the creation of visual forms.In 1967, the artist Sol Le Witt gave the new genre its name in his essay “Paragraphs on Conceptual Art,” in which he wrote, “The idea itself, even if not made visual, is as much a work of art as any finished product.” Conceptual artists used their work to question the notion of what art is, and to critique the underlying ideological structures of artistic production, distribution, and display. Developed by the Russian avant-garde at the time of the October Revolution of 1917.In photography, the range of light to dark areas in the composition.

An image with high contrast will have a greater variability in tonality while a photograph with low contrast will have a more similar range of tones.

They championed bold, gestural abstraction in all mediums, particularly large painted canvases. Often the viewer can see broad brushstrokes, drips, splashes, or other evidence of the physical action that took place upon the canvas. A non-fiction film, usually lasting no more than one to two minutes, showing unedited, unstructured footage of real events, places, people, or things. Aluminum is a relatively soft, durable, lightweight, ductile, and malleable metal with appearance ranging from silvery to dull gray. It is the most abundant metal in the earth’s crust.

Actualities preceded documentaries and were popular forms of entertainment from the early 1890s until around 1908. Informal movement in design and architecture that championed the unity of the arts, the experience of the individual craftsperson, and the qualities of materials and construction in the work itself.

Chine is the French word for China, referring to the fact that the thin paper originally used with this technique was imported from China, as well as India or Japan; collé is the French word for "glued." Related: Rirkrit Tiravanija.

Photographs made from a positive color transparency or a negative.

A member of the Beat Generation, a group of American writers and artists popular in the 1950s and early 1960s, influenced by Eastern philosophy and religion and known especially for their use of nontraditional forms and their rejection of conventional social values. French for “beautiful era,” a term that describes the period in French history beginning in 1890 and ending at the start of World War I in1914, which was characterized by optimism, relative peace across Europe, and new discoveries in technology and science. The world’s first film studio, invented in 1892–93 by American inventor Thomas Alva Edison and his assistant and protégé, William K. Despite its flammability and tendency to discolor and crack with age, celluloid was used in motion picture production until the 1930s, when it began to be replaced by cellulose-acetate safety film. Both the tissue and the support sheet are placed on top of the inked plate and run together through the printing press, sometimes with a thin layer of adhesive between them to reinforce the bond produced through the pressure of the press.