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If the photos are from accounts you’ve just shut down (or otherwise recently deleted), they may continue to appear in search results for some weeks; in that case, you can make a request for Google to remove the outdated links here.

With our digital footprints expanding, we are relaying more personal data than ever to trackers, hackers and marketers with and without our consent. But with growing concern over privacy terms that change at the drop of a hat, the sale of personal data by less scrupulous websites and the challenges of keeping stalker-y exes at bay, more and more Americans are deciding to reclaim and delete their personal data.

If you're among the roughly 59% of Americans who use a single password for a handful of accounts, deleting inactive accounts is an important security measure.

We have accounts everywhere, letting us kill time at work on Facebook, check Twitter for the latest news, cruise Pinterest for inspirational moodboards and hit Amazon for great shopping deals.

On top of that, most of us also have a pile of inactive accounts created for discounts or one-off purchases. Is withdrawing from the Internet entirely to preserve your privacy even possible? Creating profiles at sites you use regularly has many benefits such as ease of log-in and better suggestions for links or products you might like.

If a hacker cracked that password, you could suffer a domino-effect hacking of your other accounts too, especially if they are linked via a common email address.

Aside from the accounts and profiles we willingly create, our data is also exposed as hundreds of people search websites that comb police records, courthouse records and other public records such as real estate transactions, making our personal data publicly available to anyone who look for it.

Start by searching for your name in Google, selecting the Images tab.

Note what sites the pictures of you are appearing on, then individually contact the webmasters of the sites they appear on.

This is a great resource to help you remember and find unused profiles as well as gauging how much effort you'll have to expend to shut it down.

Next, review your email accounts, looking for marketing updates and newsletters, to get wind of other accounts you may still hold or companies that have bought your email address.

In recent years, Google, Facebook, and other tech heavyweights have taken to using a person's phone number as confirmation of their identity.