Psychology of dating

If daters have shared interests and experiences, it’s more likely that they will be able to click on a personal and conversational level.It’s no secret that humans have a tendency to attribute positive characteristics like intelligence or honesty to those whom they consider to be physically attractive.

Evolutionary psychologists have argued that this may be because physical characteristics can be indicative of fertility and health, which are important to our survival and reproduction as a species.Research has also shown that couples tend to be similarly matched in attractiveness.The fact that there is little to go on when deciding whether or not to pursue another user is where evolutionary psychology comes in.Contrary to popular belief, many of the decisions that human beings make actually occur unconsciously, rather than logically.While psychological knowledge is often applied to the assessment and treatment of mental health problems, it is also directed towards understanding and solving problems in several spheres of human activity.

By many accounts psychology ultimately aims to benefit society.Online dating peaks among those in their mid-twenties through mid-forties, with 22% of 25-34 year olds and 17% of 35-44 year olds reporting they used an online dating site or mobile dating app.Not only that, but 45-54 year olds are just as likely to date online as 18-24 year olds!More disturbingly, 28% of online daters have been contacted by someone who made them feel harassed or uncomfortable.Online dating gives people the unique opportunity to curate their public persona, whether that be with the use of outdated photos or by reporting inaccurate facts about themselves.Some are employed in industrial and organizational settings, or in other areas The earliest known reference to the word psychology in English was by Steven Blankaart in 1694 in The Physical Dictionary which refers to "Anatomy, which treats the Body, and Psychology, which treats of the Soul." In 1890, William James defined psychology as "the science of mental life, both of its phenomena and their conditions".