Puma dating system

Photo credit More drill holes in what was once a lintel, with extraordinary detail that is just still visible.

They were initially pounded by stone hammers—which can still be found in numbers on local andesite quarries—, creating depressions, and then slowly ground and polished with flat stones and sand The stones are of mammoth proportion.

The largest of these blocks is 25.6 feet long, 17 feet wide and 3.5 feet thick, and is estimated to weigh 131 metric tons.

Another group of archaeologists used the (unreliable) carbon dating method to date the site to about 400 AD.

The most intriguing thing about Puma Punku is the stonework.

Some believe that Puma punku couldn’t have been built without help from alien beings.

The complex is in complete ruins today with huge blocks of granite lying around on top of each other.

Photo credit Photo credit How Puma punku might have looked.

Production knives from 1973 to 1985 bear a model number as well as the BUCK and the U.

This is supposed to have been achieved by a civilization that had no writing system and was ignorant of the existence of the wheel. In assembling the walls of Puma punku, each stone was finely cut to interlock with the surrounding stones and the blocks fit together like a puzzle, forming load-bearing joints without the use of mortar.

One common engineering technique involves cutting the top of the lower stone at a certain angle, and placing another stone on top of it which was cut at the same angle.

The site appears to have been destroyed by an earthquake, perhaps accompanied by a tidal wave from Lake Titicaca.