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Direct proxies for owner ideology, such as patterns of corporate or executive donations to political parties, are also unrelated to slant.question of corporate ownership is Dellavigna and Hermle (2014).

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Here is a contents so you can skip sections you don’t want to read: [the] propaganda model focuses on this inequality of wealth and power and its multilevel effects on mass-media interests and choices.

It traces the routes by which money and power are able to filter out the news fit to print, marginalize dissent, and the dominant media firms are quite large businesses; they are controlled by very wealthy people or by managers who are subject to sharp constraints by owners and other market-profit-oriented forces; and they are closely interlocked, and have important common interests, with other major corporations, banks, and government . The first relates to the views of the media themselves and the second relates to the effect that the media actually have.

I’m going to have to apologise for the length of this post.

If there is anyone in the world who actually reads all of this, I will buy you a pint.

The general gist of my argument is that the negative effects are often overstated though not always.

I am not making any claims as to how to deal with the negative consequences and correlations laid out below.They first confirm that consumers seem to be driven toward viewpoints they already agree with (in line with the evidence above): Of those who say they turn to CNN first for information about world affairs, the average favorability toward the US is .43.In contrast, the average favorability among those who turn to Al Jazeera first is .34.We find little evidence that the identity of a newspaper’s owner affects its slant.After controlling for geographic clustering of newspaper ownership groups, the slant of co-owned papers is only weakly (and statistically insignificantly) related to a newspaper’s political alignment.You can take a very cynical view of this: Murdoch is backing the SNP in Scotland and the Tories in England to erode Labour as much as possible. On Radio 4, the political editor of the Scottish edition of : Point was at that time, as the results show, the nation and our readership was pretty divided.