What is involved in the process of radiocarbon dating get newvalues gridview rowupdating

The researchers wanted to find out if they could identify a person's year of birth or year of death using precise measurements of carbon-14 levels in different post-mortem tissues.They measured carbon-14 levels in various tissues from 36 humans whose birth and death dates were known.

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Over the past six decades, the amount of radiocarbon in people or their remains depends heavily on when they were born or, more precisely, when their tissues were formed.Forensic anthropologists at The University of Arizona took advantage of this fact in a recent study funded by NIJ.In living organisms, which are always taking in carbon, the levels of carbon 14 likewise stay constant.But in a dead organism, no new carbon is coming in, and its carbon 14 gradually begins to decay.Unlike tooth enamel, soft tissues are constantly being made and remade during life.

Thus, their radiocarbon levels mirror those in the changing environment.In contrast, from 1955 to 1963, atmospheric radiocarbon levels almost doubled.Since then they have been dropping back toward natural levels.However, the researchers suggested that soft tissue radiocarbon content would be transferred to, and preserved in, the pupal cases of insects whose larvae feed on these tissues.Such insects are simply another link in the food chain.The researchers found that if they assumed tooth enamel radiocarbon content to be determined by the atmospheric level at the time the tooth was formed, then they could deduce the year of birth.